Developing Smarter, Safer, More Successful Law Enforcement Officers

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Patrol

VIDEO: Lessons from Reaching into a Car

Jan 05, 2018 in Defensive Tactics & Driving & Roadway & Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By Tony Blauer

There’s a reason he couldn’t let go and it has to do with fear and physiology. He’s not the first cop to grab the car of a fleeing suspect. It never ends with the cop slowing the car to halt like some superhero. The grab is an unconscious reaction to the suspect’s sudden non-compliance. Trust me, he wasn’t hanging on because he thought it was a good idea. At a physiological level, the crossed-extensor reflex (CER) contracts durin... Full Article »

Mental Health Triage: Tools for LEOs, Pt. 1

Dec 21, 2017 in Fitness & Health & Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol
By

In the world of law enforcement, the most noted form of trauma is an officer-involved shooting. But from a psychological standpoint that may not necessarily be the case. So-called normal or routine calls, over time—very often, in my experience—weigh heavily on officers and can lead to trauma. That’s the bad news. The good news is that it seems the profession finally recognizes that exposure to major traumatic events requires some form of p... Full Article »

BODYCAM: Fla. Officer Dragged for Nearly Half a Mile

Dec 20, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Video
By Calibre Press

From the MiamiHerald.com: For about a half mile, a Pembroke Pines police officer clung to the side of a car as the driver careened out of a retirement community. Part of the hair-raising ride was captured on Officer John Cusack’s body camera. The camera, police say, fell off after the suspect made several “sharp maneuvers.” Surveillance video then captured the beginning of what turned into a chase through Broward during Tuesday’... Full Article »

You’ve Got to Throw the Right!

Dec 14, 2017 in Defensive Tactics & Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Patrol & Training
By David Magnusson

Go to a mirror. Any mirror. Get into a fighting stance. Got it? Now throw your money punch: a straight right cross. (If you’re left-handed, that will be a straight left. Throughout the article, keep this in mind.) Throw it in real time a few times. Mix it up a bit. Get on the balls of your feet. Throw a jab then the right. Double up on the jab then thrown the right. I am very serious. Keep doing it. Jab-jab-right! Now slow it up a bit. Take it... Full Article »

Bleeding Out

Dec 04, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training & Video
By Jim Glennon

16-year-old Steven Rahor knew what he wanted to do right away. It was the beginning of his junior year and he was sitting in his social studies class when the teacher gave out an assignment. The teacher told the students that they needed to find a partner and create a video, set to music, with images that addressed a socially significant issue of the day. In the fall of 2016 the issues of the day centered around cops—and not in a good way. Po... Full Article »

Promoting Agency Morale Up & Down the Food Chain

Nov 30, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Patrol & Training
By Jeff Shannon

The nerd in me I wish there were some objective, universal measure of LEO morale that would show us trends over the decades. That would be an interesting chart to look at. While the intuition and anecdotal evidence presented here may not be as convincing as a double blind randomized experiment, it still has good value. Based on my own experience—and that of speaking with dozens of officers, both as I was approaching retirement and after actual... Full Article »

Quality Policing: What Is It?

Nov 29, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Patrol & Training
By Crawford Coates

[Publisher's Note: Great podcasts abound, but what about one that focuses on police work from a police perspective? Enter Quality Policing with Nick Selby and Peter Moskos. Following is a recent conversation I had with Selby about the project.]  CC: What made you want to do this?   N.S.: Peter and I have been having in-depth conversations about policing for some time, and it occurred to us over this past summer that we were tackling th... Full Article »

The 8 Essentials of Getting Confessions

Nov 28, 2017 in Fitness & Health & Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By Jim Glennon

I often discuss in my seminars how I don’t actually have any true natural talents. I can’t hammer two sticks together. I have poor hand-eye coordination. I don’t know anything about cars and even less about guns (though I was a pretty good pistol shot). I don’t have a decent sense of direction. What I considered myself to be good at was getting confessions. Even more than that, I could read people. I certainly wasn’t perfect, but I was... Full Article »

My Apologies …

Nov 21, 2017 in Driving & Roadway & Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Patrol & Training
By

This is an apology to the person who thinks I snubbed him the other night. It will, I hope, serve two purposes. It will make me feel better because I have been thinking about it for a few days and it has really bothered me. It will also serve as an explanation to many in the community for what may be perceived as a "slight" to them by officers of the law. We may seem hurried, uninterested, bothered or even fearful at times. While all of these pe... Full Article »

Fly High or Drop It By

Nov 08, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Patrol & Training
By

The investigation of drug delivery by mail or parcel service is a challenge for law enforcement, making it attractive to those who want to send various types of contraband rather than deliver it personally. To prevent this, law enforcement must work with the carrier, which might come across signs of illicit items or drugs in the course of their work, so that investigators can work to identify the sender and receiver, as well as make assessments a... Full Article »

You Can’t Lead, If You Don’t Know Your People

Nov 08, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Patrol
By Jim Glennon

General Dwight D. Eisenhower, after WW II, gave a speech at a West Point graduation. In it he offered some sage advice to the cadets who were now officers. “You must know every single one of your men. It is not enough that you are the best soldier in that unit, that you are the strongest, the toughest, the most durable, the best equipped, technically—you must be their leader … That cultivation of human understanding between you and you... Full Article »

Preventable Collision?

Oct 31, 2017 in Driving & Roadway & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol
By David Kinaan

The term “preventable” can be a hard word to stomach—especially when you were just involved in a traffic collision that may have been your fault. It might imply that you should have known better and you did something wrong or failed to take an action that would have avoided the collision. Not an easy thing to accept when you’re a cop. As a cop, you are given the public’s trust. You have a tremendous amount of pride in accepting that t... Full Article »

New Year’s Homicide

Oct 23, 2017 in Education & Law Enforcement Today & Patrol
By Dave Grossi

Every now and then I like to author a reality piece that our readers might enjoy. No real teaching point, just interesting cop stuff. (The last such piece was in April, 2016, “The Full-Moon Kidnapper & a Clerk Named Sue.”) This new article has to deal with the last case I worked as a Physical Crimes detective. It was New Year’s Eve. My partner, Ron, was taking some lost time and we were on our way to drop him off at home. I was then go... Full Article »

Have a Great Training Program?

Oct 10, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By Jim Glennon

Law enforcement takes a lot of hits when it comes to, well, almost everything we do and every decision we make. Most of what the politicians, pundits, and media pushes about the collective of law enforcement is based on their own biases. Their characterization of law enforcement is supported by the use of skewed and cherry-picked stats that feed a narrative. In one specific area, I, in a strange way, agree with those who look to vilify us. Tr... Full Article »

The Face of Evil

Oct 05, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By

I read Mr. Tony Blauer’s 15 August 2017 article titled “Lessons from a Vicious Ambush.” As usual, Mr. Blauer was spot on. But even more importantly, I learned something new that gave me reason to pause and reassess my own methods of dealing with such situations. I believe I’ve always been pretty tactically sound with the various undercover, “jump-out” type units I worked in throughout my career. But resting on one’s laurels is a r... Full Article »

Protecting & Serving Protesters

Sep 13, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By Joseph Padilla

One of the freedoms we enjoy in the United States is the right to speak our minds and protest without fear of retaliation. For years I’ve participated and watched law enforcement officers attempt to protect these rights by maintaining control and keeping everyone safe at protests and demonstrations. In doing this, police officers are the visible form of authority and, unfortunately, become most at risk. I’ve observed that as people participat... Full Article »

“What’s on Your Mind, Brother?”

Aug 23, 2017 in Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By Jeff Shannon

Law enforcement, like the military, doesn’t have a "suicide problem." We have a suicide project. For every officer that takes his/her own life, there are thousands of us pushing patrol cars around wondering why we don't floor it into a wall or off the road. We need some grassroots help with this. This is our project. Recognizing this project, in the late 1960s the Los Angeles Police Department started one of the nation's first peer support pr... Full Article »

“Stop & Frisk: Legal Perspectives, Strategic Thinking, & Tactical Procedures”

Aug 15, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Patrol & Training
By Dave Grossi

Stop & Frisk: Legal Perspectives, Strategic Thinking, & Tactical Procedures is an excellent new book by Douglas R. Mitchell, JD, MPA, and Gregory J. Connor, MS, Professor Emeritus at the University of Illinois Police Training Institute. In the interest of complete disclosure, I have known both authors for a long time. Doug Mitchell has been a friend, legal contact, and training associate of mine for well over 40 years. I’ve known t... Full Article »

What Happens After You Shoot Someone?

Aug 14, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training & Video
By Crawford Coates

Publisher's Note: I recently spoke with the co-creator of Officer Involved, a film that interviews officers who have been involved in shootings, most of them fatal. This experience and the lessons learned are important for every officer to ponder. For more on this groundbreaking and critically acclaimed film series, click here.  Who are you and why did you make these films? My name is Patrick W. Shaver.  Being a police officer throughout my... Full Article »

Unpacking Our Ethical Duties

Aug 08, 2017 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By Scot DuFour

Is there ever a conceivable time that a cop accepting a free cup of coffee would be ethically acceptable? How about a time when a cop telling a lie in their official capacity would be the right thing to do? I can think of times where those two acts might not only be acceptable but the exact thing you should do. Police officers are routinely placed into situations where it seems there is no good solution. Law enforcement as a profession has come... Full Article »

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