Developing Smarter, Safer, More Successful Law Enforcement Officers

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Officer Safety & Survival

Sucker Punched

Nov 13, 2018 in Fitness & Health & Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By Richard Hough

On the street, in jails and prisons, in the home, at work, occasionally even on an airplane, one person assaults another. This seems to be an inevitable part of the human condition, most often performed by males of the species. What sometimes is surprising is that even with the presence of what most people would consider a deterrent, many people will engage in the fight or simply strike the another person. People, it would seem, often don’t con... Full Article »

The Baraka Hull Case

Nov 05, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Training
By Dave Grossi

Nineteen years ago this month, I testified in U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California in San Francisco in the matter of Hull vs. City of Oakland, Calif. I was reflecting on the circumstances of the case recently and thought perhaps the details of the shooting, the six years of uncertainty for the officer, and the jury verdict might make for an interesting read.  Following are the details. Facts On July 30, 1993, a rookie O... Full Article »

Even Cops Get Depressed

Oct 30, 2018 in Fitness & Health & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival
By

I was a police officer for 30 years, I’ve taught Criminal Justice for 14 years, and I’ve dealt with Major Depression Disorder for 20 years. The purpose of this article is to describe my experience with Major Depression, which may assist police officers who are experiencing symptoms of depression or know someone with depression. What Happened As Charles Dickens wrote, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” I loved my wif... Full Article »

Picking up Shattered Glass

Oct 29, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By John Patston

From affluent neighborhoods and upscale retail areas, to dilapidated apartment complexes and forgotten dead-ends, a city’s police department is obligated to serve the needs of all. How communities perceive their police departments can vary significantly. At its simplest level, some may only look to their police for emergencies, to be there if needed. For others, a police department may be seen as invested fellow neighbors, who are called to tak... Full Article »

Crash Reconstruction & Drones: The Gateway Drug

Oct 23, 2018 in Defensive Tactics & Driving & Roadway & Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By

If you were a child of the '80s and grew up during the "War on Drugs" era of Nancy Reagan "Just say no" slogans and Drug Abuse Resistance Education (D.A.R.E.) programs spreading through schools in the U.S., then you’re no stranger to what a gateway drug is. In case you aren’t familiar with the definition of a gateway drug I will save you the Google search: It’s a habit-forming drug that, while not itself addictive, may lead to the use of ot... Full Article »

Why Did He Shoot? Part II

Oct 17, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By Jim Glennon

Last week I addressed the Laquan McDonald shooting by Chicago Police Officer Jason Van Dyke and the absolute need to use unbiased critical thinking when analyzing the event. I specifically wrote about the default and immediate characterization of any perceived wrong by a police officer as an abuse of power because of one, or all, of the following reasons: Racism (individual and/or systemic) A callous, remorseless, violent and cruel poli... Full Article »

Why Did He Shoot?

Oct 11, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By Jim Glennon

Last week Chicago Police Officer Jason Van Dyke was found guilty of second-degree murder and 16 counts of aggravated battery for the fatal shooting of knife wielding Laquan McDonald. The 16 counts were related to every bullet the officer fired at the man. All rounds came out of his service weapon in two bursts of gunfire, the second of which occurred while the teenager was lying on the ground. Van Dyke faces a minimum 10 years in prison. Living... Full Article »

Leadership Without Title

Oct 09, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By

Leadership is a vital component to any given organization and it can be argued that leadership or the lack thereof can lead to the success or demise of an organization. Throughout the years in my law enforcement career I have noticed a couple of key takeaways about leadership. One thing that’s become evident to me is that not everyone understands the true meaning of leadership. There are many who believe that leaders have to possess a title i... Full Article »

The Myth of Pain Compliance

Oct 02, 2018 in Defensive Tactics & Fitness & Health & Officer Safety & Survival & Training
By

Almost 20 years ago, I attended a conference and listened to law enforcement trainer Phil Messina talk about the problems of using pain compliance to stop a violent attacker. This was well before I went into law enforcement myself, and, at the time, I scratched my head and wondered why he was spending so much of the limited class time to make an argument that seemed self-evident. After all, the act of attacking someone is inherently painful. If s... Full Article »

Street Survival II: The Legacy Continues

Sep 25, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival
By Crawford Coates

There would be no Calibre Press without Street Survival: Tactics for Armed Encounters. Printed in March of 1980, the book was written by Special Agent Ronald J. Adams, Lt. Thomas M. McTernan, and Charles Remsberg—an instant classic. [caption id="attachment_11473" align="alignright" width="178"] The legacy continues: Available today![/caption] “When you look at line-of-duty deaths over time,” says Dale Stockton, a retired Carlsbad (Cal... Full Article »

To Be Your Own Cornerman

Sep 10, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Training
By David Magnusson

I start off with a quote from Sylvester Stallone. No, not, “Yo, Adrian.” And surely not, “Absolutely.” Rather, I start this article with something rather profound, “If you think people are inherently good, you get rid of the police for 24 hours. See what happens.” Yes, Sylvester Stallone said that. I got to meet him when he lived in Miami for a while. The Miami Police Department served the area he resided in. He’s a gentleman. I ... Full Article »

Of Rookies: Rekindling the Blue Flame

Sep 06, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Training
By

Every time we start reading anything that starts with “Once upon a time …” we can almost predict that the closing will end with something like “… and they lived happily ever after.” Most of the time such stories share epic tales with a message in the background, like those stories of police “rookies.” For most police veterans the word rookie carries a negative connotation of inexperience, overzealousness, curiosity and everything... Full Article »

Why “Deescalation” is Becoming a Problematic Word

Aug 30, 2018 in Fitness & Health & Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By

Violence is always ugly. A lot of the public believes, however, that if the violence justified, it will look as clean as a John Wayne movie. If it looks disturbing or if someone (other than an officer) is hurt, all too many people assume that police must have done something wrong. In increasing numbers of cases, particularly when it involves someone who may (also) be suffering from some form of emotional or mental disability, the talismanic phr... Full Article »

First Responders & Their Spouses

Aug 28, 2018 in Fitness & Health & Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Training
By Crawford Coates

Once upon a time, the current co-owners of Calibre Press were not married. They were dating. They were in Atlantic City for the storied Street Survival Seminar. Jim was teaching nearly 400 cops. When one of the facilitators didn’t show up, Lisa took over. Part of her charge was selling books. On top of the box of possible books to sell was a press copy that intrigued her.  I Love a Cop, was the title, and she read it. She married Jim, they la... Full Article »

Inspirational Police Quotes

Aug 24, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Training
By Dave Grossi

[Author’s Note: I give a lot of speeches. Some are at military affairs. Most are at police functions such as academy graduations, Peace Officer Memorial Day, and so forth. I always like to pepper my speeches with a few relevant quotes. From time to time, I’m asked by other LEOs for permission to use them. I always agree to because, really, they’re not mine. My lovely wife suggested that I put a few down in print to share with our CalibrePre... Full Article »

Carnage Report

Aug 21, 2018 in Driving & Roadway & Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By Guy Quaintance

NHTSA—National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, for those who don’t know—and the other various alphabet-soup government agencies who keep track of roadway statistics tend to attribute the major causal factors of collisions on physical mechanics that are measurable. I understand this and accept it, because we have to start somewhere. While it’s true that excessive speed is a major causal factor in collisions, it’s even more true th... Full Article »

Measuring Success & Motivating Service

Aug 08, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By Jesse Williams & Randy Larcher

In the 1800s cobras were rampant throughout Delhi, India. Cobras are of course deadly, and it would be hazardous to bump into one of these large snakes on a stroll through the city. Thus, the government put a bounty on the snakes and paid citizens for cobra carcasses. This incentive induced some smart citizens to create cobra farms and raise the snakes, so they could kill them and turn them in for the bounty. The government found out about this s... Full Article »

The Debate Over Memory

Aug 06, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Leadership & Officer Safety & Survival & Training
By Jim Glennon

Radley Balko of the Washington Post writes often about the police. Never, as far as I’ve seen, favorably. In his July 31 column, “Study: ‘Cooling-off periods’ don’t help cops remember officer-involved shootings,” he writes about the practice by some agencies of letting officers calm themselves, sometimes for days, before giving a formal statement. To Balko, this is an outrageous abuse of power. He cites some research that involved p... Full Article »

Disarmings: The Reality

Aug 06, 2018 in Fitness & Health & Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Training
By Dave Grossi

My wife and I just returned from a police funeral. Fort Myers, Fla., Police Officer Adam Jobbers-Miller was shot on July 21 after responding to a call at local service station of a stolen cell phone. He pursued the suspect on foot and during the apprehension attempt, was knocked to the ground, allegedly disarmed, and shot in the head with his service pistol. He survived for a week on life support. His End of Watch was July 28, 2018.  His funera... Full Article »

Brain Power vs. Fire Power

Jul 23, 2018 in Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Training
By

 [Publisher's Note: This was originally published in November 2010 by LawOfficer.com and is reprinted here by permission of the author. Sgt. Humes (Ret), a longtime friend of Calibre Press, will be inducted into the Law Enforcement Officer Hall of Fame in September. The ceremony will be held in Maumee, Ohio, a suburb of Toledo. LEOHOF.com] “This is the law. The purpose of fighting is to win. There is no possible victory in defense. The sword... Full Article »

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