Developing Smarter, Safer, More Successful Law Enforcement Officers

Posts by Guy Quaintance:

Carnage Report

Aug 21, 2018 in Driving & Roadway & Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By: Guy Quaintance

NHTSA—National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, for those who don’t know—and the other various alphabet-soup government agencies who keep track of roadway statistics tend to attribute the major causal factors of collisions on physical mechanics that are measurable. I understand this and accept it, because we have to start somewhere. While it’s true that excessive speed is a major causal factor in collisions, it’s even more true th... Full Article »

Essential Traffic Stop Considerations

Nov 21, 2016 in Driving & Roadway & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By: Guy Quaintance

Through the years, I have been given a lot of 'advice' regarding how to conduct my traffic stops. Some of that advice has been good. And some of it has been, well … shortsighted and rigid. Some agencies prefer their officers to perform stops in a certain way. Then they go silent on the topic once their officer is off of FTO. Unfortunately, that leads many officers to either do it one way (without knowing why) or to give very little thought on ... Full Article »

Contact & Cover & Divided Attentions

Oct 06, 2016 in Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol & Training
By: Guy Quaintance

The contact-and-cover approach has been successfully used in police tactics for quite some time.  However, as increased call loads and chronic personnel shortages seem to be the rule these days, we appear to have strayed away from this practice in the name of “efficiency.” It seems difficult for many agencies to spare two officers to deal with a single individual when the list of calls for service is overwhelming the call screen. Unfortunat... Full Article »

Roadside Near-Miss: Lessons Learned

Sep 21, 2016 in Law Enforcement Today & Officer Safety & Survival & Patrol
By: Guy Quaintance

It's been said that good judgment comes from bad experience and that good experience comes from bad judgment—as long as you survive it! The reason it's taken me so long to write this article is because the incident I will describe affected me so heavily. It fundamentally altered my sense of awareness at a traffic stop. Good tactics were already instilled in me by my agency through training. However, even the best tactics—absent a heightened ... Full Article »