Would You Look Here For A Gun?

By Calibre Press  |   Mar 11, 2020

In the old days, gas station attendants used to ask if you’d like them to check under the hood. That’s actually a good question to ask yourself when you’re dealing with a suspicious vehicle and searching for weapons, as illustrated by a contact involving Pennsylvania officers.

The four were working together on a tact team with two officers in plainclothes and two in uniform when they spotted three males in a parked vehicle in a dark area where they were patrolling. While the officers watched from a distance the driver exited, popped the hood, removed something the officers couldn’t yet identify and started walking around. Armed robberies were prevalent in that vicinity, which was a high-crime area of the city. About a month prior to this encounter a person was shot during an attempted robbery nearby, and the officers figured that the target of their surveillance was probably scouting around for a stick-up victim.

After about 10 minutes, something must have spooked the subject and he returned to the car. He took something out from his coat, which he had draped over his arm, and placed it under the hood. At that point, one of the plainclothes officers determined it was likely a gun.

Soon after the car, an older model Crown Vic pulled away and the officers pulled it over. After all the occupants were secured according to high-risk vehicle stop tactics, one of the officers opened the hood and found a Tec-9 resting between the battery and the passenger right fender in a perfect position for a bad guy to reach in and grab it. The gun, which had the serial number partially filed off, was fully loaded with one in the pipe. It turned out the suspects, all of whom had rap sheets, kept it there any time the car was mobile.

Keep this in mind the next time you’re checking a car for guns and other weapons. Don’t just focus on the inside.

The following two tabs change content below.
Calibre Press

Calibre Press

Calibre Press has 37 years in the business of keeping officers safer, smarter and more successful, from rookie to retirement.