BODYCAM: Colo. Officer Shoots Man with Knife

Officer told man to drop the knife more than 40 times before he charged them

By Calibre Press  |   Nov 22, 2017

From Coloradoan.com:

Police asked Jeremy Holmes to drop the hunting knife he was holding more than 40 times before fatally shooting the 19-year-old man July 1 near the Colorado State University campus in Fort Collins, body camera footage released Tuesday shows.

Holmes can be heard in the video telling police he won’t drop the knife, and that he wants to die.

At the culmination of the confrontation, Colorado State University police Cpl. Phil Morris yelled out to Fort Collins Police Services officer Erin Mast that he was going to try to use his Taser to subdue Holmes after making multiple unsuccessful orders for Holmes to drop the knife. In the less than two seconds during which Morris reaches for his Taser, Holmes can be seen charging toward Morris. Morris and Mast then fire multiple shots from their service weapons until Holmes falls to the ground at Morris’ feet.

Fort Collins Police Services and Colorado State University Police Department released body-worn camera footage and 911 audio from two different police shootings Tuesday. 

The Coloradoan is sharing edited versions of the videos from both shootings on Coloradoan.com because they provide the most clear view to date of the actions taken by suspects and responding officers involved in each incident.

Holmes’ fatal shooting marks the first time CSU police has released body-worn camera footage from a shooting involving one of its officers. The department completed a pilot phase of a program testing the use of body-worn cameras last summer. The cameras had only been worn by officers for about two months prior to the shooting.

Two officers shot Holmes, one from Fort Collins Police Services and one from CSU, and the body camera footage from both officers was released. The officers fired a total of six shots.

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