DASHCAM: Idaho Shooting Video Released

A tense standoff erupts in gunfire, suspect lives

By Calibre Press  |   Aug 13, 2015

At a news conference on Tuesday, Bonneville County Prosecuting Attorney Daniel Clark said officers involved in the June 29th shooting of 31-year-old Ricky Mosley were justified in their use of force.

Police stopped Mosley at a Tiger Market gas station on Woodruff and Yellowstone in Idaho Falls after responding to a domestic dispute where a pregnant woman reported being hit in the face and stomach.

The video shows officers ordering Mosley to show his hands for three minutes before the shots were fired. “Ricky put your hands out the window. It’s the sheriff’s office,” said Dep. Austin Flegal. Mosley can be seen getting out of a vehicle with his hands behind his back and refusing to cooperate with police commands. On video you hear police demanding Mosley to, “Put your hands on your head. Do it now! Show me your hands.” In the video Mosley answers no and or shaking his head in the negative.

As police approach Mosley with guns and a Taser drawn, Mosley makes a sudden move, the Taser fires, but investigators say the prongs did not correctly attach and it had no effect. At almost the same time, police open fire. The investigation concluded by county prosecutors say, the four officers fired 22 rounds, five of which hit Mosley in the legs and groin. After shots were fired, police put handcuffs on Mosley and quickly began performing life saving measures. One policeman said, “Stay with us Ricky.”

Bonneville prosecuting attorney Daniel Clark said in the aftermath it was determined Mosley did not have a weapon he said, “But rather a black cellular telephone that he had in his hand behind his back.” Investigators say Mosley had a blood alcohol content level of .13. “He indicated that he was not in right frame of mind that night, that he was upset about his family situation,” said Clark.

Click here for more. 

The following two tabs change content below.
Calibre Press

Calibre Press

Calibre Press has 37 years in the business of keeping officers safer, smarter and more successful, from rookie to retirement.